Video – Texas Native Grapes: Characteristics, History and Their International Significance


Video – Texas Native Grapes: Characteristics, History and Their International Significance

Presentation by Dr. Russell D. Kane, VintageTexas at the NPSOT Houston Chapter February Meeting

It is said that Texas is home to more varieties of native grape vines than any other state. Dr. Kane’s presentation highlights the characteristics of Texas and its native grapes. It also addresses how, in the late 1800s, Texas native grape species were utilized by horticulturalist Thomas Volney Munson from Denison to offer a solution to one of the greatest agricultural devastations of all time caused by the infestation of Phylloxera vastatrix in European vineyards.

Dr. Russell Kane is an internationally recognized scientist and an award-winning Texas writer, author and wine aficionado. His bestselling book, The Wineslinger Chronicles: Texas on the Vine was released by Texas Tech Press in 2012, and Texas Hill Country Wineries – a pictorial history and wine trail guide of the Texas Hill Country Wineries was released in 2015 by Arcadia Publications.

 

 

#TXplants Twitter Event Features WATER & NATIVE PLANTS

Green roofs, Rainwater harvesting, Water smart gardening, rain gardens.

#TXplants Twitter Event Features WATER & NATIVE PLANTS 

Where: On Social Media Platform Twitter (click here) 

When: Monday, March 13, 2017, 7-8 pm CT on Twitter 

How: Search/Follow hashtag #TXplants (click here)

The third #TXplants Twitter event will be held Monday evening March 13th 7-8 pm CT and will focus on all things related to water & native plants:

  • Water smart gardens
  • Green roofs
  • Rain gardens
  • Swales
  • Rain water harvesting
  • Flood prevention
  • Native plants and prairies

Daniel Cunningham

Our featured Tweeter for this exciting, fast paced event will be Daniel Cunningham, a horticulturalist with Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center’s Water University in Dallas, Texas. Daniel will address sustainable landscape water use from design and plant selection to water conserving and landscape management practices. Daniel has a wealth of knowledge specializing in Texas native plants, vegetable gardening, edible landscaping and rainwater harvesting.

Sample discussions for this event include:

Active rainwater harvesting – Is it just a drop in the bucket or the “ultimate” water conservation tool? It’s not just the water it saves; it is a teaching tool. People just seem to have this “ah ha” moment after they hook up a barrel and start saving.

Passive rainwater harvesting using rain gardens, bioswales, aka green infrastructure – Daniel believes they are pretty important if not integral parts of the water management solution and promote Texas native plants, too.

Native plants and prairies – Do they offer a way to leverage natural environments for the benefit of flood control? How efficient are they really in terms of rain water holding capacity?

We welcome you to bring your questions for Professor Cunningham and you’re your experiences to share with others.

Access the #TXplants discussion from your Twitter page in your browser or Twitter app on your computer, pad or smartphone. Simply follow or search using this hashtag link #TXplants. Another way to monitor or join in the discussion using TweetChat at: http://tweetchat.com/room/txplants

You can experiment with it now and see who’s there and what they are sharing, and maybe launch off a few preliminary tweets to say hello. Or, for seasoned “twitterers” just show up January 13th 7-8 pm CT and join the Twitter discussion.

We will be joined by fellow NPSOT members and friends of native plants and prairies from across America on Twitter for our upcoming March 13th Also, look for members Bill Hopkins and James Holmes who will be tweeting for the NPSOT state organization and Houston chapter Twitter accounts: @NPSOT@NPSOT_HOU.

We look forward to your participation…mark your calendars for this fun-filled educational event.

Texas Native Mushrooms

Texas Native Mushrooms – To Eat or Not to Eat?

NPSOT Houston Chapter meeting presentation (January, 2017) by David Lewis, Field Museum of Natural History and Tracy Herbarium at Texas A&M University. Video by NPSOT-Houston Chapter member Nivien Saleh

This presentation gives interesting examples, information and images of common mushrooms and fungi of the Texas Gulf coast. Mr. Lewis discusses three types of fungi. He goes into detail on the common mycorrhizal genera found here, such as Amanita, Russula, Lactarius, Boletus, Cortinarius, and several others. As the genus Amanita contains some of the most deadly mushrooms, particular attention will paid to them.

He discusses the saprophytic genera of the area and examples of common lawn-growing mushrooms are given. Edibility of the local Texas Mushrooms is also discussed.

Enjoy!

Native and Prairie Plants for the Post-Wild Gardener – Jan. 10th #TXplants Twitter Event

“Post-Wild” Plano Prairie Garden – credit: Michael McDowell http://planobluestem.blogspot.com

Native & Prairie Plants for the Post-Wild Gardener – Jan. 10th #TXplants Twitter Event

Where: On Social Media Platform Twitter (click here)

When: January 10th 7-8 pm CT on Twitter

How: Search/Follow hashtag #TXplants (click here)

The next #TXplants Twitter Tuesday event will be held January 10th 7-8 pm and will focus on “Native and Prairie Plants for the Home (Post-Wild) Gardener” where fully native landscapes can be created or where natives and non-natives may coexist. This one hour long online discussion and Q&A session will have two featured guests to lead the one hour discussion. They are:

  • Thomas Rainer @ThomasRainerDC – Horticultural futurist. Land architect. Urbanist. Gardener. He writes, speaks and tweets about the role of plants in urban situations. Mr. Rainer is author of the book, Planting in a Post-Wild World (click here).
  • Jaime González @Habitat_Jaime – Houston-based Wildlife Conservationist and Educator. Serves as the Community Conservation Director for Katy Prairie Conservancy.

We are extremely happy to welcome these highly regarded naturalists to our #TXplants Twitter Tuesday forum. We welcome their tweets and your interactions with them on the following topics:

  • Planting your own backyard prairie – How do I get started?
  • Native plant resources for the homeowner – Where to go? Who can help?
  • Can native and nonnative plants successfully coexist in the “post-wild” home landscape?

Access the #TXplants Twitter discussion using your browser or Twitter app on your computer, pad or phone. Simply follow or search using the hashtag #TXplants. You are experiment with it now and see who’s there and what they are saying. Or, for seasoned “twitterers” login Tuesday January 10th 7-8 pm CT and join the discussion.

Author Thomas Rainer @ThomasRainerDC

The Chicago Tribune says that Thomas Rainer’s book is: “as practical as it is poetic.”, and it is “an optimistic call to action. “Over time…we have driven nature out of our neighborhoods and cities. But, we can invite it back by designing landscapes that look and function more like they do in the wild: robust, diverse, and visually harmonious. Mr. Rainer’s book is “dedicated to the idea of a new nature—a hybrid of both the wild and the cultivated—that can flourish. It is both a post-wild manifesto and practical guide that describes how to incorporate and layer plants into plant communities to create an environment that is reflective of natural systems and thrives within our built world.”

This is the second TXplants Twitter event; the first held in early November on Monarchs and Milkweed. For more information on the format and success of that Tweeter event, please click here for the recent Native Plant Society of Texas Newsletter – See page 12 for the “Monarchs and Milkweed: Stop, Tweet & Listen” by #TXplants Twitter Tuesday by NPSOT Houston Chapter Member and moderator, Dr. Russell Kane @VintageTexas.

Jaime González, educator & naturalist @

Our other featured guest, Jaime González, promoter of the “Nine Natives” Plan created by Coastal Prairie Partnership, Katy Prairie Conservancy and HNPAT for home gardeners, works to engage the Greater Houston community in the protection of the Katy Prairie (and other local prairies) through educational initiatives and collaborative conservation action and planning. He is also a point person for grassland restoration efforts both on the Katy Prairie Preserve and at over twenty Prairie Builder Schools and Parks locations throughout the Greater Houston area. Jaime earned a Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction – Science Education (2007) and a B.S. in Biology (1996) both from the University of Houston.

We will be joined by fellow NPSOT members and friends of native plants and prairies from across America on Twitter for our upcoming January 10th event or anytime using the hashtag #TXplants. Also, look for members Bill Hopkins and James Holmeswho will be tweeting for the NPSOT state organization and Houston chapter Twitter accounts: @NPSOT, @NPSOT_HOU.

We look forward to your participation…mark your calendars for this fun-filled educational event.

At Houston Monarch Waystation, Butterflies Provide Care for the Elderly

At Houston Monarch Waystation, Butterflies Provide Care for the Elderly

NPSOT Houston Chapter Member and videographer Nivien Saleh Ph.D. has posted a new video on our YouTube Channel. It’s title is “At Houston Monarch Waystation, Butterflies Provide Care for the Elderly“. Her video describes a butterfly garden and monarch waystation that was started at Tuscany Village, a skill nursing and rehabilitation center, located just south of Houston in Pearland.

The garden was started as a collaboration between Tuscany Village Geropsychiatrist Dr. Amy Harkins and Delia Cuellar whose 95-year old mother is a resident at Tuscany Village. NPSOT Houston Chapter members Margaret Gnewuch and Russ Kane provided assistance in garden landscape design, native plant selection and planting.

Tuscany Village Resident Releasing a Monarch Butterfly

Nivien’s video tells the story of how and why the garden was first conceived and the impact it has had on Tuscany Village residents. Tuscany Village residents have taken a deep personal interest in raising monarch caterpillars, hatching chrysalises and releasing healthy monarch butterflies.

Please watch this video because it is very touching and shows the incredible benefits native plants and wildlife can have for the elderly.

Also, please share the link to this video with those you know with family members involved in eldercare. It could make an important contribution to improving the welfare of their most loved and often hardness to comfort family members.

2017 NPSOT Houston Chapter Board Members and Committee Chairs

Monarch Butterfly on Blue Mistflower. (credit: Russ Kane).

2017 NPSOT Houston Chapter Board Members and Committee Chairs

Please welcome the incoming NPSOT Houston Chapter leadership for 2017. A list is provide below along with their position and contact information.

If you are interested in a particular topic of NPSOT Houston Chapter business, logistics or native plant activity, or wish to volunteer your services in particular areas, please feel free to contact the appropriate person/people indicated below.

For future reference, this list can also be found on our “Contact Us” page.

Position Name Email
President Wally Ward wtw3arb@aol.com
Vice President Suzy Shapiro

hssh@pdq.net

Treasurer Sheryl Marquez Trisheratops@aol.com
Secretary Judy Thomas judy.thomas@txgcmn.org
Newsletter Editor Tricia Bradbury Triciabrad@aol.com
Publicity/Community Coordinator Russ Kane  russ@rdkane.com
Plant Conservation Coordinator Katy Emde Ktart2001@yahoo.com
Environmental Organization Liaison Lan Shen Shen.gcmn@gmail.com
Past President Bruce Evans bruceevanstx@gmail.com
Display Booth Coordinator Linda Knowles dknowlespe@aol.com
Education Coordinator Cassidy Johnson

cassidybjohnson@gmail.com

Field Trips Paul Roling proling@att.net
Hospitality Coordinator Suzy Shapiro Hssh@ pdq.net
Houston Zoo Garden Coordinator Sally Hilliard sallyhilliard2@gmail.com
Membership Officer Janis Terry Terryjanis8@gmail.com
Facebook Administrator Olga Beishir olga.beishir@gmail.com
Native Landscape Certification Program Committee Margaret    Gwenuch,
Nancy Hannan,
Russ Kane
marg_g@hughes.net

russ@rdkane.com

Website Committee Linda   Knowles

Lan Shen

DKnowlespe@aol.com

Shen.gcmn@gmail.com

Join Us for #TXplants Twitter Tuesday – Native and Prairie Plants for the Home Gardener

Bushy Bluestem Prairie Grass (credit: James Holmes)

Join Us for #TXplants Twitter Tuesday – Native and Prairie Plants for the Home Gardener

Where: On Social Media Platform Twitter (click here)

When: January 10th 7-8 pm on Twitter

How: Search/Follow hashtag #TXplants (click here)

The next #TXplants Twitter Tuesday event will be held January 10th 7-8 pm. This event will focus on “Native and Prairie Plants for the Home Gardener” where fully native landscapes can be designed or where natives and non-natives may both be present. The discussion will include:

  • Planting your own backyard prairie
  • Native plant resources for the homeowner
  • Can natives and nonnatives coexist in the “post-wild” home landscape

Access the Twitter TXplants discussion using the browser or Twitter app on your computer, pad or phone. Simply follow or search using the hashtag #TXplants.

According to Dr. Russell Kane (NPSOT/TXGCMN) member and TXplants event moderator, “Our first Twitter event on Monarchs and Milkweeds in November rocked it! This online event generating over 700,000 media impressions. This has made us even more excited about this upcoming second TXplants Twitter event.

Check out the next issue of the NPSOT newsletter to read about the full details of our October #TXplants event.”

Stay tuned for more information on featured #TXplants event participants for January 10th.

Join NPSOT members and friends of native Texas plants and prairies on Twitter for our upcoming January 10th event or anytime using the hashtag #TXplants. Also look for the NPSOT state organization and Houston chapter Twitter accounts: @NPSOT @NPSOT_HOU.

Join Us for 2016 NPSOT Houston Chapter Holiday Dinner Party

Join Us for 2016 NPSOT Houston Chapter Holiday Dinner Party

When: 7:00 PM

Where: Fratelli’s Ristorante – 1330 Wirt Rd, Houston, TX 77055

Mark your calendars…

An annual tradition of the NPSOT Houston Chapter is it’s Holiday Dinner Party. This year you can join fellow NPSOT Houston Chapter members and friends at Fratelli’s Ristorante at 1330 Wirt Rd, Houston, TX 77055 on Thursday December 15, 2016. Fratelli’s has been called an Italian outpost with an old-school vibe serving homemade pasta, brick-oven pizza & classic entrees.

The event is a “Dutch Treat” meaning that everyone orders from the menu and covers their own expenses for meals and drinks.

We will also be collecting any donations of canned foods for the local food pantry.

To RSVP, contact Judy Thomas by email at judy.thomas@txgcmn.org.

We hope to see you for our Holiday Dinner!

Update Your Calendars: NPSOT 2017 Spring Symposium Announced at Wildflower Center

npsot-spring-symp

Scene from previous NPSOT Spring Symposium

Date Correction: Update Your Calendars: NPSOT 2017 Spring Symposium Announced at Wildflower Center

Mark your calendar for our annual Native Plant Society of Texas spring symposium on (corrected date) Saturday, February 25, 2017, at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.

Speakers at the event this year will include Pam Penick, author of the best-selling books Lawn Gone! and The Water Saving Garden, in addition to her popular blog Digging! Pam will share a talk prepared on making water-saving gardens, with an emphasis on using native plants (their suitability and value) and lots of eye candy photos to go with, including some before-and-afters, which people enjoy.

Beth Carroll, project and creative director for the Trails Foundation will speak on utilizing native plants in a very high use, urban naturalized setting (like the 199 acres of land and 10 miles of Trail at Lady Bird Lake which is the iconic and arguably most beloved outdoor space and heart of the city); specifically the intersection of human users and the needs of a healthy native plant ecosystem, in the context of a riparian environment.

Also speaking will be Erin O’Neil Franz, executive director of Texan by Nature, who aims to spur Texan-led conservation that produces tangible benefits for people, prosperity, and natural resources.

Additional speakers and registration details will be announced later. Registration will include admission to the Wildflower Center grounds.

The spring symposium is a joint production of the Native Plant Society of Texas and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. Click here to contact the NPSOT state office for more information.

October Meeting Presentation Video: Plant of the Month – Liatris

October Meeting Presentation Video: Plant of the Month – Liatris 

By Katy Emde, NPSOT Houston Chapter Member

Liatris is a genus of flowering plants within the sunflower family native to North America (Canada, United States, Mexico and the Bahamas). Common names include blazing star and gayfeather. Some species are used as ornamental plants, sometimes in flower bouquets. They are perennials, surviving the winter in the form of corms.

Liatris species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the flower moths Schinia gloriosa and Schinia sanguinea, both of which feed exclusively on the genus, and Schinia tertia and Schinia trifascia.

Source: Wikipedia – Liatris Click here.