Meeting


Please join us Tuesday, September 19th for our next Chapter meeting.  Our speaker will be Nico Hauwert PhD, Professional Geoscientist, who will talk about “The influence of groundwater on the native landscape.”  Dr. Hauwert will discuss the historical widespread filling of caves and cave ecosystems in Central Texas (including historical Austin Caverns on nearby Meredith Drive), their restoration and influence on groundwater flow and recharge.

Nico’s career in unraveling the mysteries of the underground frontier began through cave exploreing since 1979. He previously served as both President and Vice President for the Austin Geological Society, completed his Ph.D. dissertation in May 2009 from the University of Texas, received an M.S. in Geology from Univ. of Toledo Dept of Geology in 1991, and obtained a B.S. in Geology from University of Texas in 1984. From 1993-2000 he started groundwater tracing studies as Assessment Program manager and senior hydrogeologist for the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District. During that time he managed and led tours in Whirlpool and Lost Oasis Caves as a volunteer for Texas Cave Management Association. From 2000 to October 2016 he served as environmental scientist senior for City of Austin Watershed Protection Department, managing various cave restoration projects. He currently manages the Balcones Canyonland Preserve Program for Austin Water and teaches classes on geology and caves at Concordia University.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m.in the administration building of Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2531 Exposition Blvd., Austin. Arrive at 6:30 for snacks and seed exchange.

Please join us Tuesday, August 15th for our next Chapter meeting.  Our speaker will be Minnette Marr, who will talk about “Uses of the LBJ Wildflower Center’s seed bank.”  Minnette will touch on the past and current uses of the seed bank, as well as, describe and propose potential uses.  Minnette will invite us to collaborate with the seed bank program to better structure our seed collection efforts, and to germinate and grow out particular seeds as a group for the many varied restoration projects that at least several of us are engaged.  If there is a particular species or two that you are trying to find a seed source for, email Minnette [mmarr@wildflower.org]  by August 10, and if she has any that she can share, she will bring them with her to the meeting.

 Minnette is originally from Trinity River Watershed on the Texas Blackland Prairie (Dallas) and studied at Texas State University obtaining her M.S.  in Biology.  Minnette’s academic studies focused on floristic diversity of plant communities in Central Texas.  She has been with the LBJ Wildflower Center since October 2005 working on a variety of projects for the Millennium Seed Bank, U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Center for Plant Conservation and Texas Parks & Wildlife Department.  She currently collaborates with volunteers and landowners to inspire conservation of native plants on the Edwards Plateau and Texas Blackland Prairie.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m.in the administration building of Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2531 Exposition Blvd., Austin. Arrive at 6:30 for snacks and seed exchange.

Please join us Tuesday, June 20th for our next chapter meeting. Our speaker is Cliff Tyllick  who will talk about “Expelling Unwelcome Guests from Austin Forests.” Cliff will tell us about the progress made in these volunteer projects, the techniques he uses to control ligustrum, Chinese pistache, and other invasive plants along Walnut Creek. He would like to hear our thoughts, too, about getting more people involved in caring for our parks, greenbelts, and preserves. Maybe we can’t return our landscapes to exactly as they were hundreds of years ago, but we should be able to make them more nearly natural habitats for all to enjoy.

Photo by Linda Reams, Steck Valley restoration work 2016.

Photo by Linda Reams, Steck Valley restoration work 2016.

Cliff Tyllick dropped the only botany class he ever enrolled in, in part because he found learning about plants too fascinating to make it an academic exercise. Since 1983 he has made Austin and its alkaline clays his home, and in his spare time has read and roamed all he can to learn the plants and trees of Central Texas. Since 2013, he has led volunteers to girdle hundreds of invasive trees, uproot thousands of invasive saplings and shrubs, and replant native grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m.in the administration building of Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2531 Exposition Blvd., Austin. Arrive at 6:30 for snacks and seed exchange.

This month’s speaker is David Todd who will talk about the history of native grasslands in Texas, their loss and recovery, drawing on his books: The Texas Landscape Project: Nature and People (Texas A&M University Press 2016) and The Texas Legacy Project: Stories of Courage and Conservation (Texas A&M University Press 2010). Both books are the product of the Conservation History Association of Texas, a small, Austin-based non-profit dedicated to environmental education that Todd organized in 1997.

Mr. Todd has an A.B. in architecture and urban planning from Princeton University, an M.S. in environmental science from Rice University, and a J.D. from Emory University. He has worked as an attorney on environmental cases, a donor for conservation causes and a cattle rancher.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m.in the administration building of Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2531 Exposition Blvd., Austin. Arrive at 6:30 for snacks and seed exchange.

We hold a pot luck dinner in December instead of a normal chapter meeting. Please bring a side dish, drink, or dessert to share. This year we will meet at Phyllis Schunck’s house for a more festive location (thanks Phyllis!): 2007 Elton Lane. It’s about half a mile from our normal location at Tarrytown United Methodist Church, just south of Windsor Road, east of the fire station.  Get in touch if you need help with directions!

Time: Arrive 6:30pm, eat at 7:00pm

Location: 2007 Elton Lane, Austin TX 78703

Happy Holidays!

 

The meeting on Tuesday, September 15th, will feature a panel discussion dealing with spring bloomers, which should be planted in the fall.

The meeting will take place from 7:00 to 9:00 in the administration building of the Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2601 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX 78703. The administration building is on the southeast corner of Greenlee and Exposition. There is parking in the garage, which also has an elevator. You can enter the garage from Greenlee; look for the signs leading you to the second-floor meeting room. Arrive at 6:30 PM for snacks and seed exchange.

The meeting from 7–9 PM on May 20 of the Austin chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will include as its main presentation “Ancient People, Ancient Plants, Central Texas: Things We Know and How We Know Them ” by Dr. Leslie Bush. See our website for more details: http://npsot.org/wp/austin/2014/04/18/chapter-meeting-may-20-7-9-pm/

The May 20th meeting will take place at our new and more central location: the administration building of the Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2601 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX 78703. The administration building is on the southeast corner of Greenlee and Exposition. There is parking in the garage, which also has an elevator. You can enter the garage from Greenlee; look for the signs leading you to the second-floor meeting room.

The meeting from 7–9 PM on May 20 of the Austin chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will include as its main presentation “Ancient People, Ancient Plants, Central Texas: Things We Know and How We Know Them.” The presenter, Dr. Leslie L. Bush, has this to say about the topic:

“The Central Texas plants we enjoy today have been used for food, medicine, and crafts for millennia by the Native people of Texas. Written accounts by Spanish missionaries and European explorers, Native oral traditions, and archeological investigations provide windows into the many fascinating uses of our Texas native plants.  I’ll discuss some of our more common plants — sumac, juniper,  switchgrass, prickly pear — as well as some very important but lesser-known plants such as little barley and camas.”

Leslie L. Bush is a paleoethnobotanist, an archeologist who specializes in identifying bits of plants preserved on archeological sites, usually in the form of charcoal. She received her Ph.D. from Indiana University in 2001, and her dissertation was published by the University of Alabama Press. She has worked on sites in thirteen states including Maryland, Florida, Iowa, Indiana, and of course Texas. Leslie is currently involved with excavations by the Arkansas Archeological Society in the Ouachita National Forest, Texas Archeological Society investigations near Columbus, and Texas State University’s Ancient Southwest Texas Project near Comstock. She once found a prickly pear seed on a 600-year-old site near Indianapolis.

BushMicroscope

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The May 20th meeting will take place at our new and more central location: the administration building of the Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2601 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX 78703. The administration building is on the southeast corner of Greenlee and Exposition. There is parking in the garage, which also has an elevator. You can enter the garage from Greenlee; look for the signs leading you to the second-floor meeting room.

As usual, we will also have a seed exchange.

The meeting from 7–9 PM on April 15 of the Austin chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will be a potluck and open forum with State NPSOT Chapter Liaison Dennis Perz. After a delicious potluck plan to stay and brainstorm ways to improve our chapter’s effectiveness.

The potluck supper will be at our new and more central location: the administration building of the Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2601 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX 78703. The administration building is on the southeast corner of Greenlee and Exposition. There is parking and an elevator in the garage, which can be entered from Greenlee. Look for the signs leading you to the second-floor meeting room.

Given our new location at the church, we will not be serving alcoholic beverages, so bring something else good to eat or drink and share.

As usual, we will also have a seed exchange.

 

The March 18th chapter meeting will take place 7–9 PM in our new and more central location: the administration building of the Tarrytown United Methodist Church, 2601 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX 78703. The administration building is on the southeast corner of Greenlee and Exposition. There is parking and an elevator in the garage, which can be entered from Greenlee. Look for the signs leading you to the second-floor meeting room.

The topic for the March 18th meeting is The Four Seasons of Wildlife Gardening.
Guiding from spring through winter, Meredith O’Reilly will show you which native Texas plants are in bloom, producing seeds, or providing fruit, along with what’s happening simultaneously in the wildlife world. Along the way she will provide additional tips for creating an outstanding and ever-active wildlife garden that draws birds, pollinators, and other desired wildlife year-round.

An avid wildlife gardener, Meredith O’Reilly is also a National Wildlife Federation Habitat Steward Host, NPSOT member, Capital Area Master Naturalist, and Travis Audubon committee member. She greatly enjoys teaching and writing about native flora and fauna, as well as protecting the ecosystem through thoughtful gardening. She writes about her wildlife gardening experiences at her blog, Great Stems.

Doors open at 6:30 PM for socializing. Snacks will be provided. Nonmembers welcome; free admission.

Remember to bring:
(1) seeds to exchange and give away;
(2) mystery plants for identification.

For further information, contact Phyllis Schunck at (512) 472-2086 in Austin.

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