• Texas lantana (Lantana urticoides)
    Texas lantana will bloom in the Spring and continue until the first frost of late Autumn or Winter, at which time it can be trimmed down to the roots. (To view images in the slideshow, bring up context menu and select View image.)
    Straggler daisy (Calyptocarpus vialis)
    Also known as Horse herb, provides a good ground cover under trees such as oaks or pecans.
    Skullcap (Scuttelaria sp.) tentative ID
    This volunteer showed up next to Gulf penstemons under the shade of an oak tree. Reaching out to others has yet to arrive at a positive identification.
    Pigeonberry (Rivina humilis)
    Also known as Rouge plant, the berries can be used to create a red dye. Here the raceme of flowers is getting ready to bloom.
    Pigeonberry (Rivina humilis)
    Here the flowers have started blooming - notice there are no petals, but four petal-like sepals with colors from pink to green and white blended together.
    Prairie Coneflower, Mexican hat (Ratibida columnifera)
    Grows in almost all soils and habitats and in all agricultural zones The petals can be all yellow.
    Mealy blue sage (Salvia farinaceae) white variant
    Typically has two white stripes, this single stem has more of a white blotch. Other inflorescences on the same plant follow the typical pattern.
    Mealy blue sage (Salvia farinaceae)
    This example conforms to our expectations of what a Mealy blue sage looks like.
    Giant spiderwort (Tradescantia gigantea)
    Below the current blooms are what once were flowers on their journey to become seeds.
    Scarlet gaura (Gaura coccinea)
    As the flowers age, they turn to an intense red, also noted in the species name coccinea, which derives from the Greek word for "scarlet."
    Fineleaf fournerved daisy (Tetraneuris linearifolia)
    Originally thought this might be a Tetraneuris scaposa, but differences in the species changed our mind. Then thought it might be a Helenium amarum, which led to further investigation.
    Fineleaf fournerved daisy (Tetraneuris linearifolia)
    View from below the bloom verified that this was a Tetraneuris.
    Fineleaf fournerved daisy (Tetraneuris linearifolia)
    Whole plant photo to support classification as Tetraneuris linearifolia. All plant identifications are tentative and subject to change or clarification by botanists.
    False dayflower (Tinantia anomala)
    Easily distinguished from other Commelina family Genus and species by the "Yosemite Sam" evoking tufts of yellow and purple "hairs" on the stamens, two of which appear to be "eyes" and the other which is in place for the nose and beard.
    Antelope horns (Asclepias asperula)
    One of several native milweeds which grow in the harsh caliche soil of the southern Edwards Plateau. Here it is visited by a couple of Hairstreak butterflies and a bee, at the least.
    Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium sp.)
    Sisyrinchium species hybridize freely, and there are several species located in the Hill country of Texas. Hence no attempt is made here to determine whether this is ensigerum, angustifolium, or langlosii species.
    Black-eyed Susan, Brown-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
    This annual or short-lived perennial reseeds easily in the garden and can be used as a tea, for decoration, and has been used medicinally by Native Americans.
    Bee-brush (Aloysia gratissima)
    Bee-brush blooms from March through October, with many erect flower spikes arising from the axils of the leaves. Can be differentiated from Texas kidney wood (also known by the common name Bee-brush) by the leaves, which are single on the Aloysia gratissima and compound with many (13-47) small leaflets on the Kidney wood (Eysenhardtia texana). The Kidney wood blooms later, from May through September, so time of season may also help in identification from a distance.
    Texas thistle (Cirsium texanum)
    Seen here in early stage of blooming, it will become a wooly ball of purple to pink ray flowers. Painted Lady butterfly larva feed on the foliage, and many butterfly and insect species enjoy the nectar.
    Snake herb (Dyschoriste linearis)
    Forms colonies through underground rhizomes, making it a good ground cover in the garden and yard. Looks like some species of Ruellia, which is also in the Acanthus family, but can be distinguished by its much shorter tubes of the flowers.l
    Red yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora)
    Hesperaloe parviflora is a member of the Agavaceae (Century-Plant Family) and not actually a yucca. It is drought-resistant and can withstand minimal care in transplanting to almost any soil conditions. . Hummingbirds and deer like the flowers which appear on a long stalk.
    Engelmann's daisy (Engelmannia peristenia}
    In the cultivated garden, this flower can spread aggressively, under any conditions it can survive drought. It gets another common name, Cutlead Daisy, from the deeply lobed leaves of its rosette. Engelmannia is unusual in being a monotypic Genus - having only one species within it


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